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R40162
BR, Class 43, DVT, 43013
'OO' Gauge
Released: 17/01/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 8
The electrification of the East Coast Mainline occurring in 1987 was almost complete, with deliveries of new electric Class 91s occurring when British Rail realised the Mk4 coaches and Mk4 DVT were still not ready to go into service. As a result, eight eastern region HST power cars were converted to operate as surrogate DVTs in tandem with the new electric locomotives and a rake of Mk3 coaches. The conversion process involved the fitting of buffers and remote-control equipment.
Our Price:
£76.49
R3842
LNER (Promotional), Class W1 'Hush Hush', 4-6-4, 10000
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/01/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 3
he first reference to 10000's designation as Class W1 was on 9 November 1926, but where the widely adopted name of 'Hush-Hush' came from is disputed. It could be that the nickname arose in the late summer of 1928, as news of Gresley's new locomotive began to leak out. However other sources suggest this was possibly an internal Darlington name that came from the distinctively quiet motion sound the loco made or even because of a mistaken caption that featured in a Path News item. On 20 November 1929, nameplates were drawn up featuring the name British Enterprise and were cast soon after, but these plates were never fitted and the loco remained unnamed, being referred to as 'Hush-Hush' ever since. Yarrow's had completed the boiler in February 1929 and on April 3rd the chassis was moved from Darlington to Glasgow for testing, these being completed by October 1929 and it was during this period that wind tunnel tests led to the unusual front-end design that gave the W1 part of its distinctive appearance. Official photographs were released on December 10th and the first trial run took place on December 12th, followed by another on December 29th and 9 January 1930, the first trip to Kings Cross. Although it was to be a further six months of trials though before 10000 finally entered traffic on June 20, 1930. Between June 1930 and May 29 1933, 10000 run 70,000 miles in service, from Kings Cross to Edinburgh, including the Flying Scotsman and Queens of Scots services, but in 1934 modifications and a general repair took 10000 out of service for just over a year, the locomotive returning to traffic on June 13, 1934. At the end of January 1935, a Kylchap double blastpipe and chimney was fitted which eventually required the fitting of a smoke lifter for better smoke clearance. On August 21, 1935, 10000 was returned to Darlington for the last time in its original form, having covered another 20,823 miles since June 1934. 10000 had proved to be extremely capable, but it was also unreliable. Out of the 1,888 days in service, the locomotive spent 1,105 at Darlington Works alone.
Our Price:
£217.79
R3843
LNER, Rebuilt Class W1, 4-6-4, 10000
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/01/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 3
Having completed nearly 90,000 miles of test running since new, Sir Nigel Gresley's W1 4-6-4HP 10000 entered Darlington Works on 21 August 1935 for what was anticipated to be a major overhaul and modification. During this period Gresley decided that it was time to rebuild 10000 as a three cylinder locomotive with a conventional firetube boiler and 10000 was moved to Doncaster Works on 13 October 1936, the first drawing for the modification being prepared at the end of November. When 10000 was finally released from Doncaster Works in November 1937, it was a significantly different locomotive; being fitted with a diagram 111 boiler that was very similar to the diagram 108 boiler fitted to 2006 Wolf of Badenoch, and with a streamlined casing to the same pattern as the A4 class. As many components as possible from the original W1 were used in the rebuild, including the frames, which were shortened by 1 ½ feet at the front end. Other items, where needed, were sourced from the A4 class, the A3 class or, like the front bogie, from the B17 and an experimental double Kylchap blastpipe and chimney was fitted. The cab, while similar to that of the A4 class, was considerably longer and this led to the retained original tender's coal delivery chute having to be lengthened to compensate for the extra distance from the firebox doors. The original tender was retained, but with superficial modifications, such as to the curvature of the front plates and the addition of streamlined plating to the front and rear, although this was partially removed just a year later in 1938. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939 and during the war years, 10000 worked mainly on Kings Cross main line duties and with its power and smooth riding it was a popular engine with the LNER's drivers, though less so with the firemen due to the distance between the shovelling plate and the firehole door. The locomotive also became more 'fitter' friendly after April 1942 when the skirting was removed from ahead and behind the outside cylinders to improve access in wartime conditions. Post war, at the time of nationalization and now numbered 60700, the corridor tender was swapped for the streamlined non-corridor tender from 60004 William Whitelaw and the locomotive was engaged in more varied duties, working occasional passenger services to Leeds and Cambridge from Kings Cross alongside the occasional 'lodging' turns to Newcastle. Following allocation to Doncaster on 25 October 1953, 60700 became a more frequent visitor to Leeds and also worked turns to Sheffield, as well as Doncaster to Peterborough passenger services and various braked goods trains. In a similar circumstance to 10000 never receiving its proposed name of British Enterprise in November 1929, 60700 never received its intended name of Pegasus, for which the nameplates were cast on 13 April 1951.
Our Price:
£217.79
R4970
InterCity APT-U Ex-TS Development Vehicle, Sc48204/977527
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/01/22
Era 7
In mid-1984, TS Sc48204 was withdrawn from Set 370 004 and was sent to the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at Derby RTC for conversion to an APT-U test vehicle, with extensive rebuilding of the underframe being undertaken in order to incorporate tilting double bogies based on the BT12 units.Following the completion of the vehicle some static testing was undertaken at Derby, as well as dynamic testing on the West Coast Mainline in an APT formation, where the coach was inserted between the TBF and NDM vehicles. The APT-U project evolved into the IC140 project which, once tilt was dropped from the specifications, became the IC225 Class 91/Mk IV rollout on the East Coast Mainline.Renumbered as 977527 in Departmental use, the coach seems to have retained 48204 while testing, the number being painted out once it had been withdrawn from the APT dynamic testing some time during mid-1989. Stored at the RTC yard in Derby, the vehicle was finally scrapped in October 1989.
Our Price:
£49.49
R30010
Hitachi, Sentinel, 0-4-0, 'Chiaki Ueda'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/01/22
Era 11
Founded as Ally & MacLellan, Glasgow in 1875 and then later known as the Sentinel Waggon Works Ltd, the company went through various place and name changes until in 1957 Sentinel (Shrewsbury) Ltd was obtained by Rolls-Royce. At that time Sentinel were producing steam locomotives and lorries, but the manufacturing of these vehicles ceased in 1958. In 1959 Sentinel produced a prototype diesel shunter which was operated on the military controlled Shropshire & Montgomeryshire Railway. In total 17 were produced and operated quite successfully during that year. 1963 saw the introduction of the 34 ton chain drive 4 wheel Rolls-Royce diesel powered Sentinel shunter rated at 233 bhp which was later uprated to 255bhp. As time progressed the design was modified with all manner of variations, including 6 and 8 wheel coupled locomotives which found service in collieries, dockyards, quarries and foundries, with others being exported and operated on Portuguese Railways. Over the years, as these locomotives were retired, many found their way on to preserved railways where they continue to provide stalwart service. Locomotive build No. 10089 was constructed in 1962 before undergoing a complete refurbishment in 2007 to be delivered to Hitachi for shunting work at Ashford, primarily involving the high speed class 395 Javelina EMUs. The locomotive was named after the chairman of Hitachi Europe, 'Chiaki Ueda'.
Our Price:
£98.09
31-117
BR Standard 4MT BR2 Tender 75014 BR Lined Black (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/01/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
BR STANDARD 4MT CLASS HISTORY The 75XXX Class 4MT was one of the most popular of the BR standard classes, these adaptable mixed traffic 4-6-0s could go almost anywhere and had a longer working range than their tank engine counterpart. Their low axle load enabled them to be used over routes where the larger Class 5MT was prohibited. The design originated from the Fairburn LMS 2-6-4T, and the boiler evolved from the tank engine by lengthening the barrel by 9in, keeping the same firebox dimensions. The use of a tender gave more fuel and water for the longer journeys. A. Riddles designed the locomotive at Brighton, with help from Swindon, Derby and Doncaster. Construction took place at the BR Swindon works in 1951. The Class was allocated to the London Midland Region, the Southern Region and the Western Region. The last of the Class was withdrawn in 1968, six members have been preserved.
Our Price:
£178.45
33-878A
45T Bogie Well Wagon LMS Grey [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/01/22
Era 3
Our Price:
£29.65
35-200
LNER V2 4791 LNER Lined Green (Original)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/01/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 3
LNER CLASS V2 HISTORY The LNER Class V2 steam locomotives were designed by Sir Nigel Gresley for express mixed traffic work and were built between 1936-1944. The V2s were the only significant class of 2-6-2 tender locomotives used in Britain. 184 locomotives were built at Doncaster and Darlington Works, construction continuing through the Second World War as they proved their usefulness. The V2 was developed from the Class A1/A3 Pacifics with smaller driving wheels and a shortened boiler. During WW2, the V2 locomotives achieved fantastic performances of haulage. Trains of over 20 carriages loaded to 700 tons proved within their abilities. The most famous locomotive of the Class is No. 4771 ‘Green Arrow’ (later No. 800 and 60800). ‘Green Arrow’ was the first of the Class named for publicity purposes for the launch of the LNER’s express freight services and is the only preserved example, part of the National Collection
Our Price:
£195.45
35-201
LNER V2 60845 BR Lined Black (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/01/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 4
LNER CLASS V2 HISTORY The LNER Class V2 steam locomotives were designed by Sir Nigel Gresley for express mixed traffic work and were built between 1936-1944. The V2s were the only significant class of 2-6-2 tender locomotives used in Britain. 184 locomotives were built at Doncaster and Darlington Works, construction continuing through the Second World War as they proved their usefulness. The V2 was developed from the Class A1/A3 Pacifics with smaller driving wheels and a shortened boiler. During WW2, the V2 locomotives achieved fantastic performances of haulage. Trains of over 20 carriages loaded to 700 tons proved within their abilities. The most famous locomotive of the Class is No. 4771 ‘Green Arrow’ (later No. 800 and 60800). ‘Green Arrow’ was the first of the Class named for publicity purposes for the launch of the LNER’s express freight services and is the only preserved example, part of the National Collection
Our Price:
£195.45
35-202
LNER V2 60847 'St Peter's School' BR Lined Green (Late Crest)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/01/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 5
LNER CLASS V2 HISTORY The LNER Class V2 steam locomotives were designed by Sir Nigel Gresley for express mixed traffic work and were built between 1936-1944. The V2s were the only significant class of 2-6-2 tender locomotives used in Britain. 184 locomotives were built at Doncaster and Darlington Works, construction continuing through the Second World War as they proved their usefulness. The V2 was developed from the Class A1/A3 Pacifics with smaller driving wheels and a shortened boiler. During WW2, the V2 locomotives achieved fantastic performances of haulage. Trains of over 20 carriages loaded to 700 tons proved within their abilities. The most famous locomotive of the Class is No. 4771 ‘Green Arrow’ (later No. 800 and 60800). ‘Green Arrow’ was the first of the Class named for publicity purposes for the launch of the LNER’s express freight services and is the only preserved example, part of the National Collection.
Our Price:
£195.45
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