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31-186A
LMS 5XP 'Jubilee' Riveted Tender 45654 'Hood' BR Lined Green (Late C.)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 01/07/21
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 5
The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Jubilee Class is a steam locomotive type designed principally for main line passenger work. 191 locomotives were built between 1934 and 1936. They were built alongside the numerous LMS Stanier Class 5 4-6-0. 113 locomotives were ordered straight from the drawing board. No. 5642 which had been named Silver Jubilee on 19 April 1935 in recognition of the Silver Jubilee of King George V on 6 May of that year, gave the entire class its name. The power classification was 5XP, in common with the earlier Patriot class. In January 1951, the classification was revised to 6P; this was revised again to 6P5F in November 1955, but the latter change was not applied to the locomotives' cabsides, which continued to show 6P. The class is often associated with the Midland Division, i.e. the lines inherited from the former Midland Railway, because until the late 1950s, it was rare for any 7P locomotives to work south of Leeds. Until then, Jubilees were the largest express engine normally found on the lines running out of St Pancras or radiating from Derby. The locos were synonymous with all main lines throughout the former LMS system, over which they were known to haul many of the famous named expresses including the Irish Mail, Thames Clyde, The Waverley, Devonian, Lakes Express, Lancastrian, Manxman, Mancunian, Palatine, Peaks Express, The Pines and the Ulster Express. Four Jubilees have been preserved with two of them 45593 and 45596 being purchased directly from BR after the end of main line steam, the other two being rescued from Woodham Brothers. All four members of the class have operated in preservation and all have run on the main line. As of 2019 three members of the class are operational and all of them have main line certificates, the most recent engine being 45596 Bahamas following running in at Tyseley. While three members of the class are operational the fourth engine 45593 Kolhapur is stored inside the shed at Tyseley Loco Works awaiting its turn in the overhaul queue.
Our Price:
£169.95
31-186AFS
LMS 5XP 'Jubilee' Riveted Tender 45654 'Hood' BR Lined Green (Late C.) DCC SOUND FITTED
'OO' Gauge
Released: 01/07/21
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 5
The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Jubilee Class is a steam locomotive type designed principally for main line passenger work. 191 locomotives were built between 1934 and 1936. They were built alongside the numerous LMS Stanier Class 5 4-6-0. 113 locomotives were ordered straight from the drawing board. No. 5642 which had been named Silver Jubilee on 19 April 1935 in recognition of the Silver Jubilee of King George V on 6 May of that year, gave the entire class its name. The power classification was 5XP, in common with the earlier Patriot class. In January 1951, the classification was revised to 6P; this was revised again to 6P5F in November 1955, but the latter change was not applied to the locomotives' cabsides, which continued to show 6P. The class is often associated with the Midland Division, i.e. the lines inherited from the former Midland Railway, because until the late 1950s, it was rare for any 7P locomotives to work south of Leeds. Until then, Jubilees were the largest express engine normally found on the lines running out of St Pancras or radiating from Derby. The locos were synonymous with all main lines throughout the former LMS system, over which they were known to haul many of the famous named expresses including the Irish Mail, Thames Clyde, The Waverley, Devonian, Lakes Express, Lancastrian, Manxman, Mancunian, Palatine, Peaks Express, The Pines and the Ulster Express. Four Jubilees have been preserved with two of them 45593 and 45596 being purchased directly from BR after the end of main line steam, the other two being rescued from Woodham Brothers. All four members of the class have operated in preservation and all have run on the main line. As of 2019 three members of the class are operational and all of them have main line certificates, the most recent engine being 45596 Bahamas following running in at Tyseley. While three members of the class are operational the fourth engine 45593 Kolhapur is stored inside the shed at Tyseley Loco Works awaiting its turn in the overhaul queue.
Our Price:
£254.95
31-191
LMS 5XP 'Jubilee' 45604 'Ceylon' BR Experimental Green (British Ra.)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 01/07/21
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 4
The London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) Jubilee Class was a type of steam locomotive designed for mainline passenger work, with 191 examples being built between 1934 and 1936. These engines were intended to be an improved, tapered-boiler-fitted version of the 'Patriot' Class, having small superheaters and domeless boilers similar to the original. Initially, the performance was disappointing, and their moderate degree of superheating often left them short of steam and robbed them of much of the vivacity of the Patriots. Extensive trials showed that suitable alterations to blast pipes and chimney dimensions greatly improved the steaming capacity of the boiler, while later engines were built with regulators in the dome, larger superheaters and bigger grates. All of the earlier engines later received these improved boilers. A total of eight different patterns of tenders were paired with the engines. When built, the locomotives were unnamed and ran for almost a year until 1935 when, to commemorate King George V’s Silver Jubilee, a locomotive was named ‘Silver Jubilee’, with the Class becoming known as the Jubilees thereafter. Subsequently, other names were then chosen from countries of the British Empire, together with former Admirals and Warships, and some older names from withdrawn locomotives. No. 45637 ‘Windward Islands’ was scrapped in 1952 due to damage sustained in the Harrow and Wealdstone rail disaster. The remaining locomotives were withdrawn between 1961 and 1967. Four Jubilees have survived into preservation.
Our Price:
£169.95
379-429
Baldwin 10-12-D Tank 590 Welsh Highland Railway Lined Maroon
'OO-9' Gauge
Released: 01/07/21
DCC Ready (Next18)
The Baldwin Class 10-12-D is a narrow gauge 4-6-0 pannier tank steam locomotive, built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in the USA for the British War Department Light Railways for service in France during World War One. They were built in 1916-1917 to 600mm (1ft 11 5⁄8in.) gauge. The British War Office decided to adopt the type as its principal military steam locomotive, and Baldwin started production in 1916, building 495 locomotives between October 1916 and April 1917. Some of the class found their way to other theatres of war and nine were lost at sea. After the War many of these locomotives were sold and went on to work in France, Britain and India. British narrow gauge railways which used them included the Welsh Highland Railway, Glyn Valley Tramway, Snailbeach District Railways and Ashover Light Railway. Four Baldwin Class 10-12-D locomotives have been preserved in the UK.
Our Price:
£135.95
32-701A
Class 46 Centre Headcode 46020 BR Blue
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 7
The Class 46 1Co-Co1 BR-Sulzer Type 4 locos were built from 1961–1963 at British Railways' Derby Works and were initially numbered D138–D193. With the arrival of TOPS they were renumbered to Class 46. Fifty-six locomotives were built. The first was withdrawn in 1977 and all of them were withdrawn by the end of 1984. Class 46s began their lives with twin headcode panels situated in the centre of the nose, and later built examples a single central headcode panel, to which all class members were progressively converted. The majority received plated over nose ends with sealed beam headlights in the 1970s. Liveries worn were standard BR lined green, 'austerity' green without the cream relieveing embellishments of the original livery, and BR Blue with full yellow ends. The Class 46 design was structurally the same as the preceding Class 45 build, and had the same Sulzer engine, but differed in the fitment of a Brush generator and traction motors, in place of the Crompton Parkinson equipment fitted to the Class 45. Along with the other Sulzer class 44 and 45 designs they are often referred to as "Peaks", so named because the earliest of the Class 44 were named after mountains. Despite intermittent use on freight trains, Class 46s were regular performers on passenger turns, particularly North East-South West, Trans-Pennine and secondary North East-London trains, and depot allocations reflected this with locos at Gateshead and Plymouth in 1977 giving a typical spread. Freight workings were also quite often worked over long distances, particularly "clay hoods" carrying china clay from Cornwall to the area around Stoke-on-Trent. In the 1980s the remaining locomotives were concentrated at Gateshead depot, and the final booked passenger workings for the class were the dated summer Saturday services Bradford - Weymouth (between Bradford and Birmingham New Street), Newcastle - Plymouth, Newcastle - Blackpool North, and York - Blackpool North. The Class 46s also worked several named expresses including the Yorkshire Pullman, Flying Scotsman, Hull Executive, Thames-Clyde and Thames-Forth, also known as The Waverley, on the much lamented route from Carlisle to Edinburgh via Hawick.
Our Price:
£135.95
32-701ASF
Class 46 Centre Headcode 46020 BR Blue
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 7
The Class 46 1Co-Co1 BR-Sulzer Type 4 locos were built from 1961–1963 at British Railways' Derby Works and were initially numbered D138–D193. With the arrival of TOPS they were renumbered to Class 46. Fifty-six locomotives were built. The first was withdrawn in 1977 and all of them were withdrawn by the end of 1984. Class 46s began their lives with twin headcode panels situated in the centre of the nose, and later built examples a single central headcode panel, to which all class members were progressively converted. The majority received plated over nose ends with sealed beam headlights in the 1970s. Liveries worn were standard BR lined green, 'austerity' green without the cream relieveing embellishments of the original livery, and BR Blue with full yellow ends. The Class 46 design was structurally the same as the preceding Class 45 build, and had the same Sulzer engine, but differed in the fitment of a Brush generator and traction motors, in place of the Crompton Parkinson equipment fitted to the Class 45. Along with the other Sulzer class 44 and 45 designs they are often referred to as "Peaks", so named because the earliest of the Class 44 were named after mountains. Despite intermittent use on freight trains, Class 46s were regular performers on passenger turns, particularly North East-South West, Trans-Pennine and secondary North East-London trains, and depot allocations reflected this with locos at Gateshead and Plymouth in 1977 giving a typical spread. Freight workings were also quite often worked over long distances, particularly "clay hoods" carrying china clay from Cornwall to the area around Stoke-on-Trent. In the 1980s the remaining locomotives were concentrated at Gateshead depot, and the final booked passenger workings for the class were the dated summer Saturday services Bradford - Weymouth (between Bradford and Birmingham New Street), Newcastle - Plymouth, Newcastle - Blackpool North, and York - Blackpool North. The Class 46s also worked several named expresses including the Yorkshire Pullman, Flying Scotsman, Hull Executive, Thames-Clyde and Thames-Forth, also known as The Waverley, on the much lamented route from Carlisle to Edinburgh via Hawick.
Our Price:
£212.45
32-940
Class 150/2 2-Car DMU 150216 GWR Green (FirstGroup)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
The British Rail Class 150 Sprinter is a class of diesel multiple-unit passenger trains built by BREL York from 1984 to 1987. A total of 137 units were produced in three main subclasses, replacing many of the earlier, first-generation "Heritage" DMUs. The first subclass, 150/0 comprised a pair of prototype units. The second batch, of fifty units, was classified 150/1 and numbered in the range 150101-150. Like the prototype units, they did not have front-end gangway connections which allowed passengers to move between units working in multiple. Originally based at Derby Etches Park depot, these units were introduced in 1986, mainly concentrated around Birmingham and Manchester, and in later years restricted mainly to commuter services. Today the entire fleet is concentrated on the Northern franchise, mainly working around Manchester to places like Buxton, Sheffield, Liverpool, Southport and Carnforth. The final batch of 85 two-car units were built with front-end gangway connections. These units were classified as Class 150/2 and numbered in the range 150201-285. They were used on longer-distance services. The 150/2s have operated in Scotland, Wales, the West of England and the North.
Our Price:
£271.95
32-941
Class 150/2 2-Car DMU 150220 Northern
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
The British Rail Class 150 Sprinter is a class of diesel multiple-unit passenger trains built by BREL York from 1984 to 1987. A total of 137 units were produced in three main subclasses, replacing many of the earlier, first-generation "Heritage" DMUs. The first subclass, 150/0 comprised a pair of prototype units. The second batch, of fifty units, was classified 150/1 and numbered in the range 150101-150. Like the prototype units, they did not have front-end gangway connections which allowed passengers to move between units working in multiple. Originally based at Derby Etches Park depot, these units were introduced in 1986, mainly concentrated around Birmingham and Manchester, and in later years restricted mainly to commuter services. Today the entire fleet is concentrated on the Northern franchise, mainly working around Manchester to places like Buxton, Sheffield, Liverpool, Southport and Carnforth. The final batch of 85 two-car units were built with front-end gangway connections. These units were classified as Class 150/2 and numbered in the range 150201-285. They were used on longer-distance services. The 150/2s have operated in Scotland, Wales, the West of England and the North.
Our Price:
£250.70
33-085B
5 Plank China Clay Wagon BR Bauxite (TOPS) With Hood
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
Era 7
Our Price:
£20.65
37-256A
BR 16T Steel Mineral Wagon BR Bauxite (Early)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 24/06/21
Era 4
Our Price:
£23.35
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