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R3948
BR, Class 370 Advanced Passenger Train Non-Driving Motor (NDM), 49004,
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/10/21
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 7
The original full specification configuration for the APT-P was to comprise fourteen cars with the two power (Non-Driving Motor) cars marshalled at the outer ends of the sets. However, it soon became clear that the use of two pantographs, one on each power car, was unsuitable for the overhead power (OHP) wires in place on the West Coast Mainline at that time. Using two power cars in the middle of the train became the only operational option for British Rail, effectively cutting the train in half and this created two 1+6 formations within the APT, consisting of a DTS, TS, TRBS, TU, TF, TBF and NDM (Non-Driving Motor), through which passengers could not pass due to the high magnetic fields generated by the electrical equipment contained in the NDM. Theoretically, by siting the NDMs centrally, the preceding vehicles would clean the track, aiding adhesion over sections of the WCML such as Shap and Beattock. The arrangement would also help to mitigate the effect of suspension buckling with the train, but by far the most useful aspect of the central position of the NDM was the flexibility that it gave to formation planning for the APT, making a 1+11 configuration possible in the event that a full 2+12 formation was to prove commercially unviable. The NDM was the first vehicle completed for testing in June 1977 and in mid-1978 the power car was joined by the rest of 370 001, the first half set, for testing on the WCML. Unveiled to the press on June 7th but, hampered by industrial action, it was to be February 1979 before various formations of the full train were marshalled to test different aspects of the APT. The NDM was of a monocoque construction, with a low centre of gravity and was built from light steel. Featuring deep side skirts to provide the rigidity required of the vehicle, the BR APT Design team included tilt with the NDM in line with the rest of the train, as to not do so would add an extra 15% drag to the NDM. Link rods were also fitted between the bogie and the pantograph so as to keep the pantograph head parallel to the tracks at all times, maintaining even contact with the OHP. With different configurations being tested by BR, from the full 2+12 passenger sets to shortened 1+4 test formations, the composition of the sets soon became so disrupted that it was only really the DTS, TBF and NDM cars that remained constant, particularly during the project's latter years. Far exceeding its budget, by 1984 APT-P had effectively reached the end of its development program, the fleet of six sets had been reduced since March 1983 with parts being canonicalized to keep the remaining vehicles running. At the end of May 1985 the APT-P was withdrawn from traffic, with the Intercity Development Train (APT-D) continuing in service until December 1986.
Our Price:
£108.89
R60039
20T NCB (Ex LMS) Brake Van
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 5
Until 1968, fully fitted freight trains were required by law to be carrying a break van at the end. The brake van provided brake functionality to help slow the train as well as acting as a space in which the trains guard could carry out additional duties such as paperwork. As a result most brake vans featured a stove and desk on top of the brake apparatus. The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) built 2653 20 ton break vans between 1933 and 1947. These featured a wooden structure that spanned most of the frame, with open covered areas at either end to provide the guard with an excellent view of the train.
Our Price:
£23.85
R60022
3 Plank Wagon, LMS
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 3
This three-plank wagon belonging to LMS is based upon one built in the second half of the 1930s. The wagon could be used to transport a variety of goods and is typical of the freight that could be found on Britain's railways throughout much of the 20th century.
Our Price:
£15.75
R60023
4 Plank Wagon, F. Wilkinson
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 23
This wagon carries a livery based on one dating to July 1906 belonging to F. Wilkinson and was based at Ulverston. The wagon would likely have been used for the transportation of coal from Yorkshire to the Furness area. This wagon is typical of the freight that could be found on Britain's railways throughout much of the 20th century.
Our Price:
£15.75
R60024
5 Plank Wagon, Wadsworth & Sons
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 23
This wagon carries a livery belonging the colliery and agents Wadsworth & Sons. It would have been used to transport materials like coal and coke. This wagon is typical of the freight that could be found on Britain's railways throughout much of the 20th century.
Our Price:
£15.75
R60025
6 Plank Wagon, Burnyeat Brown & Co.
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 3
This six-plank wagon, No. 691, is presented in a livery belonging to Burnyeat Brown & Co. Limited. The wagon would have been based in Cardiff and could take a load of up to 10 Tons.This wagon represents the typical freight that would be found on Britain's railways in both the 19th and 20th century.
Our Price:
£15.75
R60026
7 Plank Wagon, Lowe & Warwick
'OO' Gauge
Released: 11/10/21
Era 23
This wagon, built as part of a batch of six in August 1906, would have spent most of its life traveling between Highbury Vale goods yard near Finsbury Park and Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire via either the Great Northern Railway or the Midland Railway. The wagon is painted in a livery belonging to Lowe & Warwick.
Our Price:
£15.75
R60019
BR (ExLMS), 20 T Brake Van, B950040
'OO' Gauge
Released: 04/10/21
Era 7
Until 1968, fully fitted freight trains were required by law to be carry a break van at the end. The brake van provided brake functionality to help slow the train as well as acting as a space in which the trains guard could carry out additional duties such as paperwork. As a result most brake vans featured a stove and desk on top of the brake apparatus. The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) built 2653 20 ton break vans between 1933 and 1947. These featured a wooden structure that spanned most of the frame, with open covered areas at either end to provide the guard with an excellent view of the train.
Our Price:
£23.85
R3996
BR, 'Clan' Standard 6MT, 4-6-2, 72009 'Clan Stewart'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 04/10/21
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 5
Based upon the Britannia Class locomotives, the BR Standard Class 6 'Clan Class' was a 4-6-2 Pacific locomotive designed by Robert Riddles to operate mixed traffic with an increased route availability. Changes included a smaller boiler, smaller cylinders and various other weight saving measures. Due to a shortage of steel only 10 of the class were ever built. The class were not hugely popular due to being less capable in comparison to the visually similar BR standard Class 7 locomotives they were based upon. 72009 'Clan Stewart' was the final 'Clan Class' locomotive, built at Crewe in 1952 and assigned to the Carlisle Kingmoor shed until being withdrawn at the end of 1965.
Our Price:
£178.19
R3995
BR, 'Clan' Standard 6MT, 4-6-2, 72004 'Clan MacDonald'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 04/10/21
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
Based upon the Britannia Class locomotives, the BR Standard Class 6 'Clan Class' was a 4-6-2 Pacific locomotive designed by Robert Riddles to operate mixed traffic with an increased route availability. Changes included a smaller boiler, smaller cylinders and various other weight saving measures. Due to a shortage of steel only 10 of the class were ever built. The class were not hugely popular due to being less capable in comparison to the visually similar BR standard Class 7 locomotives they were based upon. 72009 'Clan Stewart' was the final 'Clan Class' locomotive, built at Crewe in 1952 and assigned to the Carlisle Kingmoor shed until being withdrawn at the end of 1965.
Our Price:
£178.19
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