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31-168A
L&YR Class 5 Tank 10730 LMS Crimson Lake (LMS)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 3
The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Class 5 was a class of steam engine designed by Sir John Aspinall. No. 1008 was the first locomotive to be completed at the company’s works in Horwich near Bolton and is the only British standard gauge 2-4-2 tank engine preserved. Between 1889 and 1911, 330 locomotives of this design were produced by the L&YR for use with passenger trains over steeply graded tracks. The locomotives were fitted with a special type of water scoop (unusual in a tank engine), which operated in both directions and allowed them to pick up water from water troughs between the lines without stopping. The design was progressively enlarged throughout the construction period on the same 24ft 4ins total wheelbase to give the engines greater fuel and water capacity.
Our Price:
£123.20
31-171
L&YR Class 5 Tank 1042 L&YR Lined Black
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 2
History The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Class 5 was a class of steam engine designed by Sir John Aspinall. No. 1008 was the first locomotive to be completed at the company’s works in Horwich near Bolton and is the only British standard gauge 2-4-2 tank engine preserved. Between 1889 and 1911, 330 locomotives of this design were produced by the L&YR for use with passenger trains over steeply graded tracks. The locomotives were fitted with a special type of water scoop (unusual in a tank engine), which operated in both directions and allowed them to pick up water from water troughs between the lines without stopping. The design was progressively enlarged throughout the construction period on the same 24ft 4ins total wheelbase to give the engines greater fuel and water capacity.
Our Price:
£123.20
31-635B
GWR 64XX Pannier Tank 6414 GWR Green (GWR)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 3
64XX PANNIER TANK HISTORY First introduced into service with the Great Western Railway in 1932, the 64XX Class is an evolution of the classic GWR Pannier Tank family with its basic design dating back almost 60 years previous. The 64XX was designed by Charles Collett who reworked the classic Pannier Tank concept into a locomotive fit for the twentieth century. The Class was built for a specific purpose, the working of Push-pull passenger trains – these were also referred to as auto trains. This method of operation was more efficient, as it avoided the need for the locomotive to be uncoupled at the end of each train journey, saving time and money. The GWR pioneered the use of the auto train principle as many of their routes were branch lines. The steeply graded lines of the South Wales valleys were particularly associated with the 64XXs for over 30 years and the entire Class was fitted with equipment to operate with the auto trailers. Their operation was not confined to South Wales however, and examples were well known for working in Devon, Gloucestershire and on other parts of the GWR network. The 64XXs were a relatively small batch of locomotives, built from 1932 until 1937, the Class eventually totalled 40 examples (Nos. 6400 – 6439). All passed into BR-ownership but with the introduction of DMUs in the 1950s, withdrawals soon began towards the end of the decade, and all were withdrawn from BR use by 1964. Three 64XX locomotives were saved from scrapping and these can now be found operating on heritage lines in the UK.
Our Price:
£118.95
31-639
GWR 64XX Pannier Tank 6421 BR Lined Green (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 4
64XX PANNIER TANK HISTORY First introduced into service with the Great Western Railway in 1932, the 64XX Class is an evolution of the classic GWR Pannier Tank family with its basic design dating back almost 60 years previous. The 64XX was designed by Charles Collett who reworked the classic Pannier Tank concept into a locomotive fit for the twentieth century. The Class was built for a specific purpose, the working of Push-pull passenger trains – these were also referred to as auto trains. This method of operation was more efficient, as it avoided the need for the locomotive to be uncoupled at the end of each train journey, saving time and money. The GWR pioneered the use of the auto train principle as many of their routes were branch lines. The steeply graded lines of the South Wales valleys were particularly associated with the 64XXs for over 30 years and the entire Class was fitted with equipment to operate with the auto trailers. Their operation was not confined to South Wales however, and examples were well known for working in Devon, Gloucestershire and on other parts of the GWR network. The 64XXs were a relatively small batch of locomotives, built from 1932 until 1937, the Class eventually totalled 40 examples (Nos. 6400 – 6439). All passed into BR-ownership but with the introduction of DMUs in the 1950s, withdrawals soon began towards the end of the decade, and all were withdrawn from BR use by 1964. Three 64XX locomotives were saved from scrapping and these can now be found operating on heritage lines in the UK.
Our Price:
£118.95
31-982
BR Standard 3MT Tank 82018 BR Lined Black (Late Crest) [W]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 5
The BR Standard Class 3 2-6-2T was a class of steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for British Railways. It was essentially a hybrid design, the chassis being closely based on and sharing a number of parts with the LMS Ivatt Class 4, and having a boiler derived from a GWR No.2 boiler as fitted to the GWR Large Prairie 2-6-2T and 5600 Class 0-6-2T tank engines. From new, they were based on the Western Region, Southern Region, North Eastern Region and London Midland Region. The class had a short life as most of the work that they had been built for soon disappeared with the branch lines and the introduction of DMU services on shorter routes. When delivered new the class all carried BR lined MT black livery. From 1957 onwards, those members of the class based on the Western Region started to receive lined green livery. From the early 1960s, some Western Region class members also received unlined green livery as an economy measure. Those class members allocated to other regions retained lined black livery until withdrawal.
Our Price:
£152.95
32-114B
Class 08 13052 BR Black (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£127.45
32-131A
GWR 4575 Prairie Tank 5526 GWR Green (Great Western)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 3
4575 PRAIRIE TANK HISTORY The Great Western Railway (GWR) 4575 Class is a Small Prairie Tank locomotive which was built as a continuation of the 45XX Class. The key difference between the two Classes is the 4575’s increased water capacity of 1,300 gallons, some 300 gallons more than the 45XX and housed in larger tanks which are distinguished by their sloping top at the front end. This increased capacity added 4 tons to the weight of the locos when compared to the 45XXs, with the 4575s tipping the scales at 61 tons. Built at the GWR’s Swindon Works, exactly 100 engines were constructed between 1927 and 1929 and these were numbered 4575–4599 and 5500–5574. These would be the last of the Small Prairies built to the 45XX/4575 design. Designed for branch line operation, these charming little engines were an everyday feature of the West Country scene and in the early-1950s, a small number were fitted with auto apparatus to work push-pull trains in the South Wales valleys. With the introduction of diesel traction, the first 4575s were withdrawn in the mid-1950s, however this process was drawn out over many years and four survived until December 1964. With many of the Class ending up in Barry Scrapyard after withdrawal, the 4575s became easy targets for preservationists and some 11 examples survive today.
Our Price:
£140.20
32-132
GWR 45XX Prairie Tank 4562 BR Lined Green (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
45XX PRAIRIE TANK HISTORY The 45XX Class Prairie Tank was a development of Churchward’s earlier 44XX Class locomotives. Almost identical to the 44XX Class, the only major differences of note were the 45XX’s larger diameter driving wheels and the profile of the running plate at the front end, which was changed from a square drop to a curved drop from No. 4530 onwards. The increased wheel diameter made the 45XXs generally a more useful engine due to the resulting increase in speed. They were employed mainly on branch line duties hauling both passenger and freight trains. Built originally at Stafford Road Works, Wolverhampton between 1906 and 1908, the first batch of 45XX locomotives were numbered 2161-80 (these became Nos. 4500-4519 following renumbering in 1912). These 20 were the final locomotives to be built at Stafford Road Works and all subsequent examples came from Swindon. Swindon built four batches, with the last entering traffic in 1924, and in total 75 Class 45XXs were built. The locomotives found particular favour on the hilly lines of Wales and the West Country, and the entire Class was transferred to BR-ownership following Nationalisation in 1948. The first withdrawals occurred in early-1950, although the last remained in service until 1964. Three examples are preserved.
Our Price:
£140.20
37-951E
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With BR Crimson BD Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 4
Our Price:
£25.15
37-954A
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With 'Pickfords' BD Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 4
Our Price:
£25.15
37-975B
Conflat Wagon GWR Grey With 'GWR' AF Container [W, WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 3
Our Price:
£26.95
37-978A
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With BR Ice Blue AF Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 5
Our Price:
£25.95
371-004B
Class 08 08721 'Starlet' BR Red Star Express Parcels
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-004BSF
Class 08 08721 'Starlet' BR Red Star Express Parcels With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 8
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
371-005A
Class 08 08950 'Neville Hill 1st' BR InterCity (Swallow)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-007A
Class 08 08953 BR Engineers Grey
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-007ASF
Class 08 08953 BR Engineers Grey With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 8
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
371-010
Class 08 08441 RSS Railway Support Services
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-011
Class 08 08417 Network Rail Yellow
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-011SF
Class 08 08417 Network Rail Yellow With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 9
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
371-012
Class 08 08919 Rail Express Systems
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-012SF
Class 08 08919 Rail Express Systems With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 9
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.95
371-013
Class 08 13287 BR Green (Early Emblem)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 4
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-013SF
Class 08 13287 BR Green (Early Emblem) With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 4
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.95
371-015D
Class 08 08818 BR Blue [W]
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 7/8
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-015DSF
Class 08 08818 BR Blue [W] With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 7/8
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£216.70
371-152
Class 37/5 Refurbished 37513 Loadhaul
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 9
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-164
Class 37/4 Refurbished 37428 'David Lloyd George' BR RF. Petroleum S.
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 8
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-172
Class 37/5 Refurbished 37669 WCRC Maroon
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 9
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-173
Class 37/5 Refurbished 37521 Colas Rail Freight
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 9
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-453A
Class 37/0 Centre Headcode D6890 BR Green (Small Yellow Panels)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 5/6
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-465A
Class 37/0 Centre Headcode 37284 BR Blue
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 7/8
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-466A
Class 37/0 Split Headcode 37046 BR Engineers Grey & Yellow
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 8
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-466DB
Class 37/0 Centre Headcode 37142 BR Engineers Grey
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 8
CLASS 37 HISTORY The British Rail 1955 Modernisation Plan paved the way for the large-scale replacement of steam traction with diesel locomotives, and one of the most successful diesel locomotive designs to result from this was the English Electric Type 3. These 1,700hp Types 3 diesel-electric locomotives were built at English Electric’s Vulcan Foundry and by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns between 1960 and 1965, with 309 examples produced in total. The class proved popular with railwaymen and so in 1985, a major refurbishment programme for the Class 37 locomotives was sanctioned to extend the working lives of 135 locomotives. Features of the refurbishment involved plating over the four-character head codes and sealing off the nose end communication doors. Dedicated freight locomotives received lower gearing to increase the tractive effort, and some were fitted with extra ballast or even more powerful engines. A new subclass was created for locomotives refurbished with Electric Train Heating (ETH) equipment, allowing their use on passenger trains the whole year-round. With the sectorisation of British Rail taking hold in the early-1980s, the locomotives returned to traffic following refurbishment in a wide and diverse range of liveries. Passenger machines appeared in BR Blue Large Logo, InterCity and Regional Railways schemes to name just three, whilst freight engines received numerous varieties of Railfreight livery, Transrail, Mainline and Loadhaul. The Class continued to be widely used into the Privatisation-era, with examples operating for the likes of EWS, DRS, West Coast Railways and Colas, whilst others have received ‘retro’ heritage repaints.
Our Price:
£131.70
371-506
Class 101 2-Car DMU BR Blue & Grey
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 8
CLASS 101 DMU HISTORY The Class 101 Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) was one of the most numerous and widely used types of all the first generation DMUs. Typically formed into two-, three- or four-car sets, the first examples were introduced in 1956 and more than 600 vehicles, including driving vehicles fitted with a cab at one end and corridor gangway at the other, and intermediate cars with corridor gangways at both ends, were built by Metropolitan Cammell at Washwood Heath in Birmingham. Construction continued until 1959. Initially allocated to the North Eastern, London Midland and Scottish Regions, the units later saw use on the Eastern and Western Regions, with occasional running into Southern Region territory too. Fitted with the Blue Square control system, the Class 101s could work in multiple with other 101s and numerous other DMUs when additional capacity was required. During the 1970s BR embarked on a refurbishment programme to provide passengers with an improved travelling environment and the Class 101s were used as a testbed for these works which resulted in the majority of Class 101 vehicles being refurbished over a period of almost ten years. In later years many sets were given an additional makeover to extend their passenger service life, whilst others found new roles carrying parcels, as route learning units and for sandite operations. Around thirty two-car units were still in traffic at the start of the 21st century making the Class 101 one of the final first generation DMUs to remain in revenue-earning service. The type remains popular today, with more than forty vehicles being preserved and these can now be found operating on preserved railways around the UK.
Our Price:
£178.45
371-506SF
Class 101 2-Car DMU BR Blue & Grey With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 8
SOUNDS F0 - Lights - On/Off F1 - On - Engine Start Up / Off - Engine Shut Down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Two-Tone Horns (Speed Related) F5 - Cold Start/Light Load F6 - Engine Idle/Coasting F7 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F8 - Detonators (Speed Related) F9 - Air Tank Drain Down F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - On - Guard’s Buzzer / Off - Driver’s Response F12 - On - Guard’s Double Buzzer / Off - Driver’s Response F13 - On – Driver’s Window Opening / Off - Driver's Window Closing F14 - On – Driver’s Door Opening / Off - Driver's Door Closing F15 - Passenger Door Slamming F16 - On - Passenger Door Droplight Opens, then Door Opens / Off - Passenger Door Closes, then Droplight Closes F17 - Windscreen Wipers F18 - Fade All Sounds F19 - Hand Brake F20 - Power Car - Directional Lights Off F21 - Trailer Car - Directional Lights Off F22 - Rail Clack Sound Off F23 - Compressor Speed Up F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Please note that normal load running sounds and any other automatic or randomised sounds will also operate when this model is used on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£263.45
371-508SF
Class 101 2-Car DMU BR Green (Speed Whiskers) With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 5
SOUNDS F0 - Lights - On/Off F1 - On - Engine Start Up / Off - Engine Shut Down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Two-Tone Horns (Speed Related) F5 - Cold Start/Light Load F6 - Engine Idle/Coasting F7 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F8 - Detonators (Speed Related) F9 - Air Tank Drain Down F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - On - Guard’s Buzzer / Off - Driver’s Response F12 - On - Guard’s Double Buzzer / Off - Driver’s Response F13 - On – Driver’s Window Opening / Off - Driver's Window Closing F14 - On – Driver’s Door Opening / Off - Driver's Door Closing F15 - Passenger Door Slamming F16 - On - Passenger Door Droplight Opens, then Door Opens / Off - Passenger Door Closes, then Droplight Closes F17 - Windscreen Wipers F18 - Fade All Sounds F19 - Hand Brake F20 - Power Car - Directional Lights Off F21 - Trailer Car - Directional Lights Off F22 - Rail Clack Sound Off F23 - Compressor Speed Up F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Please note that normal load running sounds and any other automatic or randomised sounds will also operate when this model is used on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£263.45
371-508
Class 101 2-Car DMU BR Green (Speed Whiskers)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 5
CLASS 101 DMU HISTORY The Class 101 Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) was one of the most numerous and widely used types of all the first generation DMUs. Typically formed into two-, three- or four-car sets, the first examples were introduced in 1956 and more than 600 vehicles, including driving vehicles fitted with a cab at one end and corridor gangway at the other, and intermediate cars with corridor gangways at both ends, were built by Metropolitan Cammell at Washwood Heath in Birmingham. Construction continued until 1959. Initially allocated to the North Eastern, London Midland and Scottish Regions, the units later saw use on the Eastern and Western Regions, with occasional running into Southern Region territory too. Fitted with the Blue Square control system, the Class 101s could work in multiple with other 101s and numerous other DMUs when additional capacity was required. During the 1970s BR embarked on a refurbishment programme to provide passengers with an improved travelling environment and the Class 101s were used as a testbed for these works which resulted in the majority of Class 101 vehicles being refurbished over a period of almost ten years. In later years many sets were given an additional makeover to extend their passenger service life, whilst others found new roles carrying parcels, as route learning units and for sandite operations. Around thirty two-car units were still in traffic at the start of the 21st century making the Class 101 one of the final first generation DMUs to remain in revenue-earning service. The type remains popular today, with more than forty vehicles being preserved and these can now be found operating on preserved railways around the UK.
Our Price:
£178.45
372-850
Class 769 4-Car BiMU 769008 Transport for Wales
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 769 HISTORY The Class 769 is a type of bi-mode or tri-mode multiple unit train capable of operating on electrified lines via 25kV overhead wires and/or 750V DC third rail, or on non-electrified lines via a diesel engine. They have been converted from surplus dual-voltage Class 319 units by Brush Traction and are to be used by Transport for Wales, Northern and Great Western Railway. The Class 769 units have primarily been designed to run on routes with multiple power supplies, such as the Rhymney Valley line in Wales which has overhead wires and non-electrified stretches and the units can change between EMU and DMU model whilst the train is in motion. Rolling stock company Porterbrook first conceptualised the Class 769 in 2016 when, in partnership with Northern, they began work on converting Class 319/4 units to provide a solution to a shortage of diesel units and deferrals of electrification projects on the network. These units were chosen for the conversion as they had recently undergone upgrades to install new passenger information systems and accessible toilets, as well as having suitable space for a new diesel power pack and alternator to power the existing electric traction systems. The first conversions were completed in 2018 and testing was undertaken at the Great Central Railway in Leicestershire, with the first unit delivered to Northern in 2018, although the first to enter service was a Transport for Wales unit in November 2020.
Our Price:
£297.45
372-877
Class 319 4-Car EMU 319362 Northern Rail
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 319 HISTORY The British Rail Class 319 is a dual-voltage electric multiple unit train capable of operating on 25kV 50Hz AC from overhead wires or 750V DC from a third rail. They were built by British Rail Engineering Limited's York carriage works for use on north-south cross-London services. Built in two batches in 1987–88 and 1990 for BR's Network SouthEast sector, the units were primarily used on the then-new Thameslink service operating from Bedford to Brighton and various other destinations south of London. The majority of the fleet remained in use on the Thameslink network after its reshaping and privatisation in 1997, with a few units moving to Southern. Some of the fleet was also used on various other services operating out of London Victoria, including flagship expresses to Brighton. Since delivery of new Class 700 rolling stock for Thameslink services commenced in 2015, Class 319 units have been redeployed for use in the Northwest of England on newly electrified lines as well as being converted to self-powered trains for use away from the electricity supply.
Our Price:
£297.45
377-526D
BR 20T Brake Van BR Grey (Early)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 4
Our Price:
£26.95
377-529A
BR 20T Brake Van BR Engineers Grey & Yellow [W]
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 8
Our Price:
£28.75
377-530
BR 20T Brake Van BR Bauxite (TOPS) 'Air Piped' [W]
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 7
Our Price:
£28.75
38-021A
CEA Covered Hopper Loadhaul [W]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 8
Our Price:
£34.15
38-049
MTA Open Wagon Ex-Loadhaul (EWS) [W, WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 9
Our Price:
£34.15
38-052A
MTA Open Wagon EWS [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 9
Our Price:
£34.15
38-272A
BR 22T 'Presflo' Cement Wagon BR Bauxite (TOPS) 'Rugby Cement'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 7
Our Price:
£44.95
38-273
BR 22T 'Presflo' Cement Wagon 'Blue Circle Cement' Yellow
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 5
Our Price:
£44.95
38-345B
BR FNA Nuclear Flask Wagon Flat Floor with Flask
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 8
Our Price:
£53.95
38-347B
BR FNA Nuclear Flask Wagon Sloping Floor with Flask
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 8
Our Price:
£53.95
38-874
BR 12T 'Vanwide' Ventilated Van BR Bauxite (TOPS) [W]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 7
Our Price:
£35.95
38-875
BR 12T 'Vanwide' Ventilated Van BR Departmental Olive Green
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 7
Our Price:
£35.95
39-735DC
BR Mk2F DBSO (Refurb.) Driving Brake Sec. Open BR InterCity (Swallow)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
Era 8
MODEL FEATURES: Bachmann Branchline OO Scale Era 8 Pristine InterCity (Swallow) livery Running No. 9710 Accessory Pack including Obstacle Deflectors NEM Coupling Pockets Close Coupling Mechanism Length 270mm Directional Lighting Interior Lighting Door Interlock Lighting (when used on DCC) DCC-control of all lighting via the integrated DCC decoder
Our Price:
£134.95
32-612A
Class 90 90041 Freightliner Green
'OO' Gauge
Released: 15/06/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
Fifty Class 90 locomotives were ordered by British Rail in 1986 to replace the ageing Class 85 fleet on West Coast Main Line duties, whilst also allowing BR to cascade a number of Class 86s to East Anglia. Constructed at British Rail Engineering Limited, Crewe, the new locomotives were initially classified as 87/2s however this was soon changed to Class 90 as the design featured a completely new body-shell – although much of the technology within was shared with the Class 87s. Construction of the 110mph rated locomotives was completed in 1990 and the fleet was split between different sectors of British Rail – 15 were allocated to InterCity services, five for Rail Express Systems (mail and parcels traffic) and the remaining 30 for Railfreight Distribution. Most of those allocated to Railfreight Distribution would later be downgraded to 75mph and reclassified as 90/1s numbered in the 901xx series following work to isolate the Electric Train Heating and push-pull equipment making them dedicated freight locos. Upon privatisation the Class 90 fleet was split between Virgin Trains, EWS and Freightliner. By 1999 all of the Class 90/1s acquired by EWS had been converted back to 90/0s due to an increased requirement for passenger locomotives to work contracted ScotRail sleeper trains and for hire to GNER for East Coast Main Line services. Further renumbering by EWS occurred when nine locos were fitted with different brake blocks and these became Class 90/2s numbered in the 902xx series. The Freightliner locos were also converted back to their original specification in the early 2000s. The Class 90s have carried numerous liveries including three decorated in European liveries for the Freightconnection event in 1992 which coincided with the opening of the Channel Tunnel to freight services. No. 90128 was decorated in SNCB turquoise (Belgium), No. 90129 in DB red (Germany) and No. 90130 in SNCF orange and grey (France) and each carried the name Freightconnection in their respective languages, alongside No. 90022 which was named ‘Freightconnection’ and carried Railfreight Distribution livery. The majority of the Class have carried names whilst in service and the 90s have appeared a variety of other post-Privatisation liveries such as GNER, DB Schenker, First ScotRail, One (Anglia), Greater Anglia, National Express, DRS and Malcolm Logistics. Today, Class 90s remain in operation with Freightliner, DB Cargo UK (ex-EWS/DB Schenker) and most recently Locomotive Services which has acquired Nos. 90001 and 90002 and repainted them into InterCity Swallow livery for use on charters and excursions.
Our Price:
£195.45
32-613
Class 90 90026 BR InterCity (Mainline)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 15/06/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 8
Fifty Class 90 locomotives were ordered by British Rail in 1986 to replace the ageing Class 85 fleet on West Coast Main Line duties, whilst also allowing BR to cascade a number of Class 86s to East Anglia. Constructed at British Rail Engineering Limited, Crewe, the new locomotives were initially classified as 87/2s however this was soon changed to Class 90 as the design featured a completely new body-shell – although much of the technology within was shared with the Class 87s. Construction of the 110mph rated locomotives was completed in 1990 and the fleet was split between different sectors of British Rail – 15 were allocated to InterCity services, five for Rail Express Systems (mail and parcels traffic) and the remaining 30 for Railfreight Distribution. Most of those allocated to Railfreight Distribution would later be downgraded to 75mph and reclassified as 90/1s numbered in the 901xx series following work to isolate the Electric Train Heating and push-pull equipment making them dedicated freight locos. Upon privatisation the Class 90 fleet was split between Virgin Trains, EWS and Freightliner. By 1999 all of the Class 90/1s acquired by EWS had been converted back to 90/0s due to an increased requirement for passenger locomotives to work contracted ScotRail sleeper trains and for hire to GNER for East Coast Main Line services. Further renumbering by EWS occurred when nine locos were fitted with different brake blocks and these became Class 90/2s numbered in the 902xx series. The Freightliner locos were also converted back to their original specification in the early 2000s. The Class 90s have carried numerous liveries including three decorated in European liveries for the Freightconnection event in 1992 which coincided with the opening of the Channel Tunnel to freight services. No. 90128 was decorated in SNCB turquoise (Belgium), No. 90129 in DB red (Germany) and No. 90130 in SNCF orange and grey (France) and each carried the name Freightconnection in their respective languages, alongside No. 90022 which was named ‘Freightconnection’ and carried Railfreight Distribution livery. The majority of the Class have carried names whilst in service and the 90s have appeared a variety of other post-Privatisation liveries such as GNER, DB Schenker, First ScotRail, One (Anglia), Greater Anglia, National Express, DRS and Malcolm Logistics. Today, Class 90s remain in operation with Freightliner, DB Cargo UK (ex-EWS/DB Schenker) and most recently Locomotive Services which has acquired Nos. 90001 and 90002 and repainted them into InterCity Swallow livery for use on charters and excursions.
Our Price:
£195.45
32-615
Class 90 90004 'City of Glasgow' Virgin Trains (Original)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 15/06/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
Fifty Class 90 locomotives were ordered by British Rail in 1986 to replace the ageing Class 85 fleet on West Coast Main Line duties, whilst also allowing BR to cascade a number of Class 86s to East Anglia. Constructed at British Rail Engineering Limited, Crewe, the new locomotives were initially classified as 87/2s however this was soon changed to Class 90 as the design featured a completely new body-shell – although much of the technology within was shared with the Class 87s. Construction of the 110mph rated locomotives was completed in 1990 and the fleet was split between different sectors of British Rail – 15 were allocated to InterCity services, five for Rail Express Systems (mail and parcels traffic) and the remaining 30 for Railfreight Distribution. Most of those allocated to Railfreight Distribution would later be downgraded to 75mph and reclassified as 90/1s numbered in the 901xx series following work to isolate the Electric Train Heating and push-pull equipment making them dedicated freight locos. Upon privatisation the Class 90 fleet was split between Virgin Trains, EWS and Freightliner. By 1999 all of the Class 90/1s acquired by EWS had been converted back to 90/0s due to an increased requirement for passenger locomotives to work contracted ScotRail sleeper trains and for hire to GNER for East Coast Main Line services. Further renumbering by EWS occurred when nine locos were fitted with different brake blocks and these became Class 90/2s numbered in the 902xx series. The Freightliner locos were also converted back to their original specification in the early 2000s. The Class 90s have carried numerous liveries including three decorated in European liveries for the Freightconnection event in 1992 which coincided with the opening of the Channel Tunnel to freight services. No. 90128 was decorated in SNCB turquoise (Belgium), No. 90129 in DB red (Germany) and No. 90130 in SNCF orange and grey (France) and each carried the name Freightconnection in their respective languages, alongside No. 90022 which was named ‘Freightconnection’ and carried Railfreight Distribution livery. The majority of the Class have carried names whilst in service and the 90s have appeared a variety of other post-Privatisation liveries such as GNER, DB Schenker, First ScotRail, One (Anglia), Greater Anglia, National Express, DRS and Malcolm Logistics. Today, Class 90s remain in operation with Freightliner, DB Cargo UK (ex-EWS/DB Schenker) and most recently Locomotive Services which has acquired Nos. 90001 and 90002 and repainted them into InterCity Swallow livery for use on charters and excursions.
Our Price:
£195.45
32-619
Class 90 90030 'Crewe Locomotive Works' EWS
'OO' Gauge
Released: 15/06/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
Fifty Class 90 locomotives were ordered by British Rail in 1986 to replace the ageing Class 85 fleet on West Coast Main Line duties, whilst also allowing BR to cascade a number of Class 86s to East Anglia. Constructed at British Rail Engineering Limited, Crewe, the new locomotives were initially classified as 87/2s however this was soon changed to Class 90 as the design featured a completely new body-shell – although much of the technology within was shared with the Class 87s. Construction of the 110mph rated locomotives was completed in 1990 and the fleet was split between different sectors of British Rail – 15 were allocated to InterCity services, five for Rail Express Systems (mail and parcels traffic) and the remaining 30 for Railfreight Distribution. Most of those allocated to Railfreight Distribution would later be downgraded to 75mph and reclassified as 90/1s numbered in the 901xx series following work to isolate the Electric Train Heating and push-pull equipment making them dedicated freight locos. Upon privatisation the Class 90 fleet was split between Virgin Trains, EWS and Freightliner. By 1999 all of the Class 90/1s acquired by EWS had been converted back to 90/0s due to an increased requirement for passenger locomotives to work contracted ScotRail sleeper trains and for hire to GNER for East Coast Main Line services. Further renumbering by EWS occurred when nine locos were fitted with different brake blocks and these became Class 90/2s numbered in the 902xx series. The Freightliner locos were also converted back to their original specification in the early 2000s. The Class 90s have carried numerous liveries including three decorated in European liveries for the Freightconnection event in 1992 which coincided with the opening of the Channel Tunnel to freight services. No. 90128 was decorated in SNCB turquoise (Belgium), No. 90129 in DB red (Germany) and No. 90130 in SNCF orange and grey (France) and each carried the name Freightconnection in their respective languages, alongside No. 90022 which was named ‘Freightconnection’ and carried Railfreight Distribution livery. The majority of the Class have carried names whilst in service and the 90s have appeared a variety of other post-Privatisation liveries such as GNER, DB Schenker, First ScotRail, One (Anglia), Greater Anglia, National Express, DRS and Malcolm Logistics. Today, Class 90s remain in operation with Freightliner, DB Cargo UK (ex-EWS/DB Schenker) and most recently Locomotive Services which has acquired Nos. 90001 and 90002 and repainted them into InterCity Swallow livery for use on charters and excursions.
Our Price:
£195.45
32-620
Class 90 90048 Freightliner Grey [W]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 15/06/22
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 9
Fifty Class 90 locomotives were ordered by British Rail in 1986 to replace the ageing Class 85 fleet on West Coast Main Line duties, whilst also allowing BR to cascade a number of Class 86s to East Anglia. Constructed at British Rail Engineering Limited, Crewe, the new locomotives were initially classified as 87/2s however this was soon changed to Class 90 as the design featured a completely new body-shell – although much of the technology within was shared with the Class 87s. Construction of the 110mph rated locomotives was completed in 1990 and the fleet was split between different sectors of British Rail – 15 were allocated to InterCity services, five for Rail Express Systems (mail and parcels traffic) and the remaining 30 for Railfreight Distribution. Most of those allocated to Railfreight Distribution would later be downgraded to 75mph and reclassified as 90/1s numbered in the 901xx series following work to isolate the Electric Train Heating and push-pull equipment making them dedicated freight locos. Upon privatisation the Class 90 fleet was split between Virgin Trains, EWS and Freightliner. By 1999 all of the Class 90/1s acquired by EWS had been converted back to 90/0s due to an increased requirement for passenger locomotives to work contracted ScotRail sleeper trains and for hire to GNER for East Coast Main Line services. Further renumbering by EWS occurred when nine locos were fitted with different brake blocks and these became Class 90/2s numbered in the 902xx series. The Freightliner locos were also converted back to their original specification in the early 2000s. The Class 90s have carried numerous liveries including three decorated in European liveries for the Freightconnection event in 1992 which coincided with the opening of the Channel Tunnel to freight services. No. 90128 was decorated in SNCB turquoise (Belgium), No. 90129 in DB red (Germany) and No. 90130 in SNCF orange and grey (France) and each carried the name Freightconnection in their respective languages, alongside No. 90022 which was named ‘Freightconnection’ and carried Railfreight Distribution livery. The majority of the Class have carried names whilst in service and the 90s have appeared a variety of other post-Privatisation liveries such as GNER, DB Schenker, First ScotRail, One (Anglia), Greater Anglia, National Express, DRS and Malcolm Logistics. Today, Class 90s remain in operation with Freightliner, DB Cargo UK (ex-EWS/DB Schenker) and most recently Locomotive Services which has acquired Nos. 90001 and 90002 and repainted them into InterCity Swallow livery for use on charters and excursions.
Our Price:
£195.45
R60086
Hornby Railways 50th Anniversary Wagon, 1972 - 2022
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/06/22
Our Price:
£18.89
R60088
20T BR (ExLMS) Brake Van
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/06/22
Era 7
Our Price:
£26.54
R60421
20T Brake Van, LMS
'OO' Gauge
Released: 13/06/22
Era 3
Our Price:
£22.04
R30089
Transport for Wales, Class 67, Bo-Bo, 67014
'OO' Gauge
Released: 10/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 11
A total of thirty Class 67 locomotives were built between 1999 and 2000 by Alstom, in Spain, for English, Welsh & Scottish Railway (EWS). These Bo-Bo configured diesel electric locomotives have a large fuel capacity, electro-pneumatic brakes and a top speed of 125mph (200km/h). The bodyshell is a monocoque load bearing Alstom design, whilst the bogies, also designed by Alstom, are of an 'H' frame design. The engine, traction motors and control electronics are the same as those used in the Class 66, but differ in that the traction motors are frame mounted, rather than axle hung, to reduce unsprung mass. The gear ratios have also been increased, allowing higher speeds and the cab is designed around a central driving position. The Class 67 locomotives are able to supply electric head-end power for passenger train heating and air-conditioning and are equipped for buffer and screw coupling, as well as also coupling via a buckeye coupler, attached on a swing arm mount. Locomotive number 67014 was built in March 2000 for EWS. In 2008 the locomotive was repainted silver and grey and operated for Wrexham & Shropshire under the name 'Thomas Telford'. The locomotive also operated Chiltern Railways services before eventually being repainted into its current Transport for Wales livery and preforming services hauling a rake of Mk4 coaches.
Our Price:
£174.59
R3960
GWR, Terrier Train Pack - Era 3
'OO' Gauge
Released: 10/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 3
The London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LB&SCR) A1 Class 0-6-0T locomotive was designed by William Stroudley. A total of 50 locomotives were built between 1872 and 1880. Initially, the Class were designed to haul commuter trains on the heavily congested lines in South and South-East London, as well as operating through the Marc Isambard Brunel designed Thames Tunnel. The LB&SCR later introduced larger and more capable D Class locomotives which began being used for most of the company’s commuter trains. Nonetheless, the reliability of the A1 Class was such that most were put to other work or sold on to other railways rather than being scrapped. Between 1911 and 1913 twelve of the A1s that had remined at the LB&SCR were rebuilt with new boilers and extended smoke boxes to become the A1X Class along with a further four after the First World War. By 1923, at the formation of Southern Railway, 15 locomotives had remained in LB&SCR ownership, and these along with another 9 locomotives which had been sold to other railways in the region fell into Southern Railway ownership. Weight restrictions on many of the light railways inherited by the Southern Railway necessitated that the light A1 Class locomotives remain in service despite their old age. One A1 locomotive and 14 A1X locomotives remained in service long enough to enter into British Railway stock. Most of these remained in the Southern Region, although one remained in the Western Region having previously found its way into GWR ownership after been sold to the Weston Clevedon & Portishead Railway (WCPR) which closed in 1940. The Class remined in service until many of the lines they operated on were eventually closed. The last of these was the line to Hayling Island which was scheduled for closure in November 1963. With the impending closure of the line, BR decided to withdraw the Class from service. At the time of her withdrawal, No. 32636 was the oldest working steam engine in British Railways ownership. The final operational A1X with BR was No. 32678, which remained in service until August 1963. LB&SCR No. 43 ‘Gipsyhill’ entered service in June 1877. In 1919 it was rebuilt as an A1X Class locomotive before becoming one of the locomotives sold to the WCPR for £785 in December 1925 where it was renamed Portishead. After the closure of the WCPR the locomotive was sold to GWR in 1940 where it became No. 5. The locomotive remined in service with GWR and later BR until January 1950 before being scrapped in Swindon in March 1954. GWR Train Pack contains: Terrier 43, 4W Full Brake, 4W Brake/3rd and 4W 4 Door
Our Price:
£196.19