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R30161
Transport for Wales, Class 67, Bo-Bo, 67020
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 11
Class 67 locomotives are a class of Bo-Bo diesel-electric locomotives which were built for the English Welsh & Scottish Railway (EWS) between 1999 and 2000 by Alstom at Meinfesa in Valencia, Spain with drive components from General Motors' Electro-Motive Division, builders of the Class 66. The bodyshell is a monocoque load-bearing Alstom design, the bogies are an "H" frame Alstom design, the engine, traction motors and control electronics are GM-EMD products. Unlike the Class 66, the traction motors are frame mounted rather than axle hung to reduce unsprung mass and the gear ratio is increased allowing higher speeds which reflect the locomotives' mixed traffic brief. The cab design has a central driving position. Initially, the class were used primarily on mail trains. In June 2003 EWS lost the Royal Mail mail train contract, with services diminishing to complete cessation in March 2004. The locomotives have since been used by First ScotRail on the Caledonian Sleeper on non-electrified lines north of Edinburgh. In April 2015, GB Railfreight commenced a contract to haul the Caledonian Sleeper with 67004 repainted and renamed for use on the service. When GB Railfreight started to provide the trains and crews for the Serco franchise in 2015, it was planned to use rebuilt Class 73/9s. The first of these came into service in February 2016. The Class 67s continued to be used on some services for another couple of years. Class 67s are also used as Thunderbird rescue locomotives for failed trains on the East Coast Main Line, on some freight trains and for use on chartered tourist trains. Two locomotives were assigned to, and received special liveries for, use with the Royal Train from 2003, and a third had a commemorative jubilee livery applied for use with the Royal Train during the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012. No. 67020 entered service in 2000 with a standard EWS red and yellow livery. The Class 67 locomotive was transferred to DB Cargo UK from EWS ownership in 2007. In October 2022, 67020 was transferred to Transport for Wales on lease from DB Cargo UK. To haul the TfW Mk4 coach sets, 67020 was repainted into a hybrid DB/TfW black and red livery with TfW branding.
Our Price:
£175.49
R40436
L&MR, Royal Mail Coach
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
Era 1
Upon the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1830, an agreement was made to carry mail on the railway. A Royal Mail coach would be placed on the end of a train with a guard seated high up on a special seat at the back of the coach keeping a watchful eye. As the first specifically designed Mail Coach to be used on a railway, it paved the way for a long-standing relationship between railways and the mail.
Our Price:
£35.99
R40439
L&MR, 3rd Class Coach
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
Era 1
Having established the concepts of first and second-class rail travel, it was only a matter of time before railway companies created a lower fare 'third class' for the carriage of the working classes, especially in the densely populated industrial areas. Companies such as the Manchester, Bolton and Bury Railway, the Manchester and Leeds Railway, and the Sheffield, Ashton-under-Lyne and Manchester Railway all used open third-class carriages, mostly for standing passengers, but sometimes fitted with a rudimentary bench (or benches). The L&MR considered creating a third class as early as 1839, due to market pressure from the MB&BR and M&LR, but the directors were afraid that, with its lower fares, it would draw passengers away from the first and second-class trains. The introduction of third-class travel on the L&MR dates to April 1844, when the Board ordered new enclosed second-class coaches to replace the older 'blue boxes', which were then downgraded to third class. The first of the L&MR third-class train services ran in October 1844, departing from Manchester at 06:30 and from Liverpool at 18:30.
Our Price:
£26.99
R40445
L&MR, 1st Class Coach 'Sovereign'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
Era 1
The Liverpool & Manchester Railway opened to much fanfare on 15th September 1830. So much so, that a new station had to be built to satisfy passenger numbers and to plan for the ongoing ‘rail fever’ at the time. Liverpool Road Station saw passengers booking tickets and awaiting their train’s arrival. Passengers were separated into first and second class and had different booking halls and waiting rooms. First-class passengers enjoyed a non-stop service between Liverpool and Manchester which was quicker than travelling via second-class trains. They travelled in ‘glass coaches’ that emulated the typical horse-drawn carriage common to the 19th century. First-class passengers also had the opportunity to stop at a first-class station and enjoy food and drink in the refreshment room. The selling of alcohol and food was forbidden for second-class passengers.
Our Price:
£35.99
R7326
HM7040: Bluetooth® Legacy Dongle
Released: 26/02/24
DCC Accessory
This Bluetooth® Legacy Dongle allows the HM | DCC app to work with older DCC Controllers from Hornby. Add Bluetooth and Smartphone/tablet control to your existing Hornby DCC Controllers! The dongle works with all Hornby DCC decoders - including the Elite, Select and Railmaster. This will allow the HM | DCC app to control of all your previous non-Bluetooth decoders. The Legacy Dongle works via the XpressNet socket - this is a common socket included in many other brands of DCC Controller, however, Hornby are unable to confirm if the Dongle will work seamlessly with other brands of controller.
Our Price:
£35.99
R30228
LMS Princess Coronation Class 4-6-2 6222 'Queen Mary'
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
DCC Ready (21 Pin)
Era 3
The LMS 'Coronation' Class were an enlarged and improved version of William Stanier's earlier LMS 'Princess Royal' Class, and on test were the most powerful steam locomotives ever used in Britain at 2,511 dbhp, specifically designed for power. The intention from the start was to use them on express services between London Euston and Glasgow Central; their duties were to include the hauling of a proposed non-stop express, subsequently named the Coronation Scot. The first ten locomotives of the 'Coronation's were built in a streamlined form in 1937 by the addition of a steel streamlined casing. 6222 was rare for the Class in that it was named after a Queen, specifically The Queen Mary rather than a Princess. While many 'Princess Coronation' locomotives have been preserved, sadly 'Queen Mary' was withdrawn in October 1963, and scrapped in November.
Our Price:
£217.99
R3895
Rowntree & Co., Ruston & Hornsby 88DS, 0-4-0, No. 3
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 6
Ruston & Hornsby Ltd, of Lincoln, was formed as the result of the merger between Ruston, Proctor & Co. Ltd and Richard Hornsby & Sons Ltd on September 11, 1918 and their first narrow gauge diesel locomotive left the works on September 1, 1931. In the summer of 1932, production was moved to the larger Boultham Works, where the firm were eventually to become Britain's largest builder of diesel locomotives, with over 6,500 being built by the time production ceased in 1969. Almost as soon as the firm's 44/48HP 0-4-0 locomotives were making an appearance, an upgraded, more powerful 0-4-0 was on the drawing board. Although many of the features of the 44/48HP were retained for the new 80/88HP, such as the chain drive and running gear, a new type of transmission was fitted, along with Westinghouse airbrakes. The new power unit, Ruston's own 4VPB, delivered 80BHP at 1000rpm and was later supplanted by Ruston's improved 4VPH that delivered 88BHP, but it required compressed air to be injected into the cylinders to be able to start. While running, an air reservoir was kept charged via the braking system, but after standing idle for a period the reservoir depleted and a secondary source was required to recharge the reservoir. This was achieved by fitting a small, secondary 1½HP 'donkey' engine, giving rise to a distinctive raised cover on the right hand side of the engine compartment that differed in size and placement depending on the make of engine used. Two basic weight options were offered for the 80/88HP, of 17 tons and 20 tons, the difference being achieved by attaching weights to the outside frames, as well as to the front and rear buffer beams. In 1941, Ruston's locomotive classifications were changed, with the 80/88HP becoming 88DS (with the narrow gauge versions being assigned the DSM and DSN suffix, and the broader gauges assigned DSW). Outward appearance changes to the 'standard' locomotives were mainly confined to the cab area, with examples from mid-1947 replacing the open cab with a fully enclosed cab that featured several ad-hoc styles of front window. The final 88DS, 518494, left Boultham Works on 29 November 1967, bringing to an end a production run of 271 locomotives. Ruston 441934 was built new for Rowntree & Co. Ltd of York, being delivered in April 1960 to join R&H 421419/1958 and 432479/1959 in the confectionery company's fleet of locomotives as No. 3. In 1979, the York factory bought a new 0-6-0 locomotive and No.3 was transferred to Rowntree's Fawdon factory in Newcastle. Rail services at Fawdon came to a halt on 30 January 1987, with No. 3 being handed over to the North York Moors Railway for preservation. After some years being moved about it was purchased in 2013 by two members of the Derwent Valley Light Railway, Glynnis and Tony Frith. 441934 has now been named Ken Cooke, in honour of the former Rowntree's York employee, D-Day veteran and holder of France's highest military honour, the Legion dHonneur.
Our Price:
£102.59
R3896
BR, Ruston & Hornsby 88DS, 0-4-0, No. 84
'OO' Gauge
Released: 26/02/24
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 6
Ruston & Hornsby Ltd, of Lincoln, was formed as the result of the merger between Ruston, Proctor & Co. Ltd and Richard Hornsby & Sons Ltd on September 11, 1918 and their first narrow gauge diesel locomotive left the works on September 1, 1931. In the summer of 1932, production was moved to the larger Boultham Works, where the firm were eventually to become Britain's largest builder of diesel locomotives, with over 6,500 being built by the time production ceased in 1969. Almost as soon as the firm's 44/48HP 0-4-0 locomotives were making an appearance, an upgraded, more powerful 0-4-0 was on the drawing board. Although many of the features of the 44/48HP were retained for the new 80/88HP, such as the chain drive and running gear, a new type of transmission was fitted, along with Westinghouse airbrakes. The new power unit, Ruston's own 4VPB, delivered 80BHP at 1000rpm and was later supplanted by Ruston's improved 4VPH that delivered 88BHP, but it required compressed air to be injected into the cylinders to be able to start. While running, an air reservoir was kept charged via the braking system, but after standing idle for a period the reservoir depleted and a secondary source was required to recharge the reservoir. This was achieved by fitting a small, secondary 1½HP 'donkey' engine, giving rise to a distinctive raised cover on the right hand side of the engine compartment that differed in size and placement depending on the make of engine used. Two basic weight options were offered for the 80/88HP, of 17 tons and 20 tons, the difference being achieved by attaching weights to the outside frames, as well as to the front and rear buffer beams. In 1941, Ruston's locomotive classifications were changed, with the 80/88HP becoming 88DS (with the narrow gauge versions being assigned the DSM and DSN suffix, and the broader gauges assigned DSW). Outward appearance changes to the 'standard' locomotives were mainly confined to the cab area, with examples from mid-1947 replacing the open cab with a fully enclosed cab that featured several ad-hoc styles of front window. The final 88DS, 518494, left Boultham Works on 29 November 1967, bringing to an end a production run of 271 locomotives. Ruston 432478 was built new for British Railways, being delivered in January 1959 to the North Eastern Region Civil Engineers Department at the Leeman Road Permanent Way Stockyard in York, one of six Ruston & Hornsby 88DS locomotives built for British Railways which were distributed between York, Dinsdale Depot, Etherley Tip, Crofton, Hartlepool and Darlington. As well as working shunting duties at Leeman Road, 432478 also worked at the York Central Concrete Depot, which is now the site of the Railway Museum's main visitor car park.
Our Price:
£102.59
922004
'INSPIRED BY TITFIELD' WAGON TRIPLE PACK
'OO' Gauge
Released: 20/02/24
“Inspired by” Titfield wagon pack ‘Iron Mink’ van in Valentine & Taylor Wines & Spirits livery. Always marshalled first in the train, this ex-GWR ‘Iron Mink’ van carries the necessary liquid refreshments required for the buffet car. 1907 five-plank open wagon in Pearce & Crump livery. Ex-cons Pearce & Crump have finally given in and are using the railway for their scrap business, collecting smashed and broken hulks for breaking-up. 1907 seven-plank open wagon in Titfield Coal Company livery. To satisfy the demands of Thunderbolt’s firebox, the nearby Dunkerford Colliery is re-opened, making the Titfield line self-sufficient for many years to come. “THE TITFIELD THUNDERBOLT™ is a trade mark of Studiocanal Films Ltd. and is used under licence from Studiocanal Films Ltd.”
Our Price:
£89.95
35-352SF
Class 20/0 Disc Headcode & Tablet Catcher D8032 BR Green (Late Crest) With DCC Sound Fitted
'OO' Gauge
Released: 20/02/24
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 5
SOUNDS F0 - Directional Lights - On / Off (plus Light Switch Sound) F1 - On - Warm Engine Start / On (with F8 On) - Cold Engine Start F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Two Tone Horn (Speed Related) F5 - On - Light Train Mode / Off - Heavy Train Mode F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Cold Start F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard's Whistle F11 - Buffer Up F12 - Coupling F13 - Cab End High Intensity Light (If Fitted) F14 - On - Night Mode Directional Lights / Off - Day Mode Directional lights (If Fitted) F15 - Detonators F16 - Priming Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Driver's Door Open / Off - Driver's Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - Nose End Directional Lights Off F21 - Cab End Directional Lights Off F22 - Cab Light On (Only when Stationary) F23 - Windscreen Wipers F24 - Compressor F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunt Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Please note that normal load running sounds and any other automatic or randomised sounds will also operate when this model is used on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£276.20
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