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31-168A
L&YR Class 5 Tank 10730 LMS Crimson Lake (LMS)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 3
The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Class 5 was a class of steam engine designed by Sir John Aspinall. No. 1008 was the first locomotive to be completed at the company’s works in Horwich near Bolton and is the only British standard gauge 2-4-2 tank engine preserved. Between 1889 and 1911, 330 locomotives of this design were produced by the L&YR for use with passenger trains over steeply graded tracks. The locomotives were fitted with a special type of water scoop (unusual in a tank engine), which operated in both directions and allowed them to pick up water from water troughs between the lines without stopping. The design was progressively enlarged throughout the construction period on the same 24ft 4ins total wheelbase to give the engines greater fuel and water capacity.
Our Price:
£123.20
31-171
L&YR Class 5 Tank 1042 L&YR Lined Black
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 2
History The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Class 5 was a class of steam engine designed by Sir John Aspinall. No. 1008 was the first locomotive to be completed at the company’s works in Horwich near Bolton and is the only British standard gauge 2-4-2 tank engine preserved. Between 1889 and 1911, 330 locomotives of this design were produced by the L&YR for use with passenger trains over steeply graded tracks. The locomotives were fitted with a special type of water scoop (unusual in a tank engine), which operated in both directions and allowed them to pick up water from water troughs between the lines without stopping. The design was progressively enlarged throughout the construction period on the same 24ft 4ins total wheelbase to give the engines greater fuel and water capacity.
Our Price:
£123.20
31-635B
GWR 64XX Pannier Tank 6414 GWR Green (GWR)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 3
64XX PANNIER TANK HISTORY First introduced into service with the Great Western Railway in 1932, the 64XX Class is an evolution of the classic GWR Pannier Tank family with its basic design dating back almost 60 years previous. The 64XX was designed by Charles Collett who reworked the classic Pannier Tank concept into a locomotive fit for the twentieth century. The Class was built for a specific purpose, the working of Push-pull passenger trains – these were also referred to as auto trains. This method of operation was more efficient, as it avoided the need for the locomotive to be uncoupled at the end of each train journey, saving time and money. The GWR pioneered the use of the auto train principle as many of their routes were branch lines. The steeply graded lines of the South Wales valleys were particularly associated with the 64XXs for over 30 years and the entire Class was fitted with equipment to operate with the auto trailers. Their operation was not confined to South Wales however, and examples were well known for working in Devon, Gloucestershire and on other parts of the GWR network. The 64XXs were a relatively small batch of locomotives, built from 1932 until 1937, the Class eventually totalled 40 examples (Nos. 6400 – 6439). All passed into BR-ownership but with the introduction of DMUs in the 1950s, withdrawals soon began towards the end of the decade, and all were withdrawn from BR use by 1964. Three 64XX locomotives were saved from scrapping and these can now be found operating on heritage lines in the UK.
Our Price:
£118.95
31-639
GWR 64XX Pannier Tank 6421 BR Lined Green (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (6 Pin)
Era 4
64XX PANNIER TANK HISTORY First introduced into service with the Great Western Railway in 1932, the 64XX Class is an evolution of the classic GWR Pannier Tank family with its basic design dating back almost 60 years previous. The 64XX was designed by Charles Collett who reworked the classic Pannier Tank concept into a locomotive fit for the twentieth century. The Class was built for a specific purpose, the working of Push-pull passenger trains – these were also referred to as auto trains. This method of operation was more efficient, as it avoided the need for the locomotive to be uncoupled at the end of each train journey, saving time and money. The GWR pioneered the use of the auto train principle as many of their routes were branch lines. The steeply graded lines of the South Wales valleys were particularly associated with the 64XXs for over 30 years and the entire Class was fitted with equipment to operate with the auto trailers. Their operation was not confined to South Wales however, and examples were well known for working in Devon, Gloucestershire and on other parts of the GWR network. The 64XXs were a relatively small batch of locomotives, built from 1932 until 1937, the Class eventually totalled 40 examples (Nos. 6400 – 6439). All passed into BR-ownership but with the introduction of DMUs in the 1950s, withdrawals soon began towards the end of the decade, and all were withdrawn from BR use by 1964. Three 64XX locomotives were saved from scrapping and these can now be found operating on heritage lines in the UK.
Our Price:
£118.95
31-982
BR Standard 3MT Tank 82018 BR Lined Black (Late Crest) [W]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 5
The BR Standard Class 3 2-6-2T was a class of steam locomotive designed by Robert Riddles for British Railways. It was essentially a hybrid design, the chassis being closely based on and sharing a number of parts with the LMS Ivatt Class 4, and having a boiler derived from a GWR No.2 boiler as fitted to the GWR Large Prairie 2-6-2T and 5600 Class 0-6-2T tank engines. From new, they were based on the Western Region, Southern Region, North Eastern Region and London Midland Region. The class had a short life as most of the work that they had been built for soon disappeared with the branch lines and the introduction of DMU services on shorter routes. When delivered new the class all carried BR lined MT black livery. From 1957 onwards, those members of the class based on the Western Region started to receive lined green livery. From the early 1960s, some Western Region class members also received unlined green livery as an economy measure. Those class members allocated to other regions retained lined black livery until withdrawal.
Our Price:
£152.95
32-114B
Class 08 13052 BR Black (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£127.45
32-131A
GWR 4575 Prairie Tank 5526 GWR Green (Great Western)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 3
4575 PRAIRIE TANK HISTORY The Great Western Railway (GWR) 4575 Class is a Small Prairie Tank locomotive which was built as a continuation of the 45XX Class. The key difference between the two Classes is the 4575’s increased water capacity of 1,300 gallons, some 300 gallons more than the 45XX and housed in larger tanks which are distinguished by their sloping top at the front end. This increased capacity added 4 tons to the weight of the locos when compared to the 45XXs, with the 4575s tipping the scales at 61 tons. Built at the GWR’s Swindon Works, exactly 100 engines were constructed between 1927 and 1929 and these were numbered 4575–4599 and 5500–5574. These would be the last of the Small Prairies built to the 45XX/4575 design. Designed for branch line operation, these charming little engines were an everyday feature of the West Country scene and in the early-1950s, a small number were fitted with auto apparatus to work push-pull trains in the South Wales valleys. With the introduction of diesel traction, the first 4575s were withdrawn in the mid-1950s, however this process was drawn out over many years and four survived until December 1964. With many of the Class ending up in Barry Scrapyard after withdrawal, the 4575s became easy targets for preservationists and some 11 examples survive today.
Our Price:
£140.20
32-132
GWR 45XX Prairie Tank 4562 BR Lined Green (Early Emblem)
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (8 Pin)
Era 4
45XX PRAIRIE TANK HISTORY The 45XX Class Prairie Tank was a development of Churchward’s earlier 44XX Class locomotives. Almost identical to the 44XX Class, the only major differences of note were the 45XX’s larger diameter driving wheels and the profile of the running plate at the front end, which was changed from a square drop to a curved drop from No. 4530 onwards. The increased wheel diameter made the 45XXs generally a more useful engine due to the resulting increase in speed. They were employed mainly on branch line duties hauling both passenger and freight trains. Built originally at Stafford Road Works, Wolverhampton between 1906 and 1908, the first batch of 45XX locomotives were numbered 2161-80 (these became Nos. 4500-4519 following renumbering in 1912). These 20 were the final locomotives to be built at Stafford Road Works and all subsequent examples came from Swindon. Swindon built four batches, with the last entering traffic in 1924, and in total 75 Class 45XXs were built. The locomotives found particular favour on the hilly lines of Wales and the West Country, and the entire Class was transferred to BR-ownership following Nationalisation in 1948. The first withdrawals occurred in early-1950, although the last remained in service until 1964. Three examples are preserved.
Our Price:
£140.20
37-951E
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With BR Crimson BD Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 4
Our Price:
£25.15
37-954A
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With 'Pickfords' BD Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 4
Our Price:
£25.15
37-975B
Conflat Wagon GWR Grey With 'GWR' AF Container [W, WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 3
Our Price:
£26.95
37-978A
Conflat Wagon BR Bauxite (Early) With BR Ice Blue AF Container [WL]
'OO' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
Era 5
Our Price:
£25.95
371-004B
Class 08 08721 'Starlet' BR Red Star Express Parcels
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-004BSF
Class 08 08721 'Starlet' BR Red Star Express Parcels With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 8
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
371-005A
Class 08 08950 'Neville Hill 1st' BR InterCity (Swallow)
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-007A
Class 08 08953 BR Engineers Grey
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 8
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-007ASF
Class 08 08953 BR Engineers Grey With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 8
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
371-010
Class 08 08441 RSS Railway Support Services
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-011
Class 08 08417 Network Rail Yellow
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Ready (Next18)
Era 9
CLASS 08 HISTORY The first diesel shunters were pioneered by the LMS which began trialling designs during the 1930s. It soon became apparent that this form of traction offered many advantages over the steam locomotive – the former being ‘ready to use’ as and when required, whereas steam locos had to be kept at the ready even when not required immediately – with the obvious staffing and fuel costs associated with doing so. By the time of Nationalisation in 1948, the LMS had built various shunters and the 12033 series was adopted by BR as the basis for a new standard design of diesel-electric shunting locomotive. As a stop gap whilst the Class 08 was being developed, BR constructed further 12033 series locomotives and these would later be designated as Class 11s. Production of the 08s began in 1952 with the first example, No. 13000, entering traffic in 1953. Construction continued until 1962 and during the ten year period, 996 locomotives were built making the Class 08 the most numerous of all British locomotive classes. In addition, construction of the near-identical Class 09s (26 examples) and Class 10s (171) took the total well above a thousand – the former differed in having higher gearing whilst the latter had different engines and transmission. Built ‘in-house’ at BR’s Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster and Horwich Works, the 08s were allocated across the BR regions, with many being based at major stations and terminals where stock was marshalled and positioned ready for service, where trains were divided or merged, and of course at many freight facilities. Although they had a top speed of just 15 mph, what the 08s lacked in speed they more than made up for with tractive effort which was more than double that of the 03s and 04s. Although the first example was withdrawn in 1967, just four had gone prior to the introduction of TOPS and despite an ever-decreasing need for shunting locomotives, around a quarter of the Class remained in traffic at the start of the 21st century. Upon Privatisation of British Rail in 1994, EWS inherited many of the survivors, with others going to passenger operators for use as depot shunters. More than a decade later EWS was still operating over 40 of the shunters, with many more in store. Even today, Class 08s can still be found earning their keep at numerous depots, freight facilities and railway workshops. Meanwhile, ever since the first withdrawals Class 08s have been popular machines with heritage railways and today, more than 70 have found a new lease of life in preservation – often carrying out similar tasks to those for which they were designed some seven decades ago.
Our Price:
£123.20
371-011SF
Class 08 08417 Network Rail Yellow With DCC Sound
'N' Gauge
Released: 22/06/22
DCC Fitted
DCC Sound
Era 9
SOUNDS F1 - Engine Start-up / Shut-down F2 - Brake F3 - Single Horn (Speed Related) F4 - Double Horn F5 - Cold Start / Light Load F6 - Engine Idle / Coasting F7 - Speed Lock F8 - Exhauster (Vacuum Train Brakes) F9 - Flange Squeal (Speed Related) F10 - Guard’s Whistle F11 - Buffer Clash F12 - Coupling F13 - Compressor F14 - Sanders F15 - Handbrake F16 – Fuel Transfer Pump F17 - Wagon Snatching & Buffering F18 - On - Cab Door Open / Off - Cab Door Closed F19 - Fade All Sounds F20 - 'Draw Up’ F21 - ‘Squeeze Up’ F22 - 'I’m Going Under’ F23 - Window Wipers F24 - Station Ambience F25 - Spirax Valves F26 - Shunting Mode F27 - Volume Down F28 - Volume Up Analogue Users: Directional lights and basic Prime Mover (engine) sounds, which vary with speed, plus any other automated sounds, can be enjoyed when using this model on analogue control (DC) straight from the box!
Our Price:
£208.20
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